Building product information requirements

Last updated: 9 June 2022

Builder measuring timber on a building site

On 7 June 2022, new regulations on building product information requirements (Building (Building Product Information Requirements) Regulations 2022) were made by the Government. Learn what this means for you.

The new regulations have been made to provide building product users with information about how building products contribute to compliance with the building code. They place obligations on Aotearoa New Zealand-based manufacturers, importers, retailers, and distributers.

The regulations will commence on 11 December 2023, which gives those impacted 18 months to prepare to meet their obligations.  The regulations apply to designated building products manufactured in, or imported into, Aotearoa New Zealand on, or after, 11 December 2023.

Read more about the regulations.

Building (Building Product Information Requirements) Regulations 2022 (SL 2022/170) — legislation.govt.nz

Background

The Building Amendment Act 2021 introduced new minimum information requirements for building products, to support better informed decision-making by building consent authorities, building owners, builders and designers. The new regulations designate a number of building products for which building product information must be provided and establishes the minimum requirements for that information.

The regulations were informed by feedback received from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s (MBIE’s) public consultation on building product information requirements in 2021. Information about the consultation, including the discussion document outlining proposals for regulations and a summary of the submissions, are available on MBIE’s website.

Read the discussion document and see a summary of the submissions received.

Have your say - Building system reform: Proposals for regulations — mbie.govt.nz

Why the regulations have been made

Building products are central to safe and durable buildings, yet until now, information about products has not been required. This has meant that variable information has been provided about how products contribute to building code compliance, and how they should be used and installed.

Building consent authorities (BCAs) frequently request additional information about specified products to ensure compliance with building code requirements. This creates costly delays for building owners.

In addition, an increasing range and complexity of building products and building methods, and cheaper alternatives available, has increased the risk of not meeting building code requirements by using products that are not fit for purpose, or not used correctly.

The new building product information requirements apply to products that may contribute to building code compliance. Information on these products will help designers, builders and consumers choose the right products, install them in the correct way and make informed decisions about using alternative products where there are product shortages. Building consent authorities will have the right information readily available to check that plans and specifications meet the building code, which will support more efficient consenting.

In addition, the requirements will ensure people, including homeowners, are given the information they need to make good decisions about products, and use them as intended.

The changes in the Building Amendment Act 2021, and these regulations, are just one part of a broader suite of building system reforms, which aim to lift the efficiency and quality of building work, and provide fairer outcomes if things go wrong.

What the regulations mean

Aotearoa New Zealand-based manufacturers and importers must provide a minimum level of information about the designated building products they supply to the Aotearoa New Zealand market. The information must be publicly available online, and they must be able to provide evidence for any claims they make about their products. It is recommended that the information be easy to understand, as it will be used by a wide range of people.

Aotearoa New Zealand-based distributers and retailers will need to check that the designated building products they supply include the relevant building product information, and that the information is available to their customers.

Information about designated building products must be published and maintained on an internet site that is publicly available, without a need to sign up, provide an email address or login. The website address must be disclosed on the packaging of the product, on the product itself, on a sign next to where the product is sold, alongside the product listing if sold online, or in any similar way that provides a clear link to the internet site where the product information can be accessed.

Information requirements to be displayed online include:

  • the name and a description of the product (or product line from which the product is customised) and its intended use
  • a product identifier (in most circumstances)
  • the legal and trading name of manufacturers and, if applicable, importers 
  • a statement specifying the relevant clauses of the building code and how the product is expected to contribute to compliance, as well as any limitations on the use of the product
  • any design, installation, and maintenance requirements
  • either a statement that the product is not subject to any warnings or bans, or a description of warnings or bans applicable to the product.

Summary of information that must be provided

There are two classes of designated building products with different information requirements for each. The below summarises the information that must be provided for each class of product and when the information must be made available.

Class 1: Batch or mass-produced products

Batch or mass-produced products that are typically available for retail or wholesale purchase. For example, cladding products, mechanical fixings, insulation products, internal lining, roofing products, structural wood-based products, structural steel and reinforcing products, sanitary plumbing and drainage products, including tapware (note: this is not an exhaustive list).

What information must be disclosed

  • A description of the building product.
  • A product identifier.
  • Details of the manufacturer and (where applicable) importer, including contact information.
  • Information on the scope and limitations of use for the building product, and how it is expected to contribute to relevant building code clauses.
  • Design, installation, and maintenance requirements.
  • A statement confirming the product is not subject to a warning or ban under the Building Act 2004, or a description of any warning or ban that has been made in relation to the product.

When information must be disclosed

Either before or when the product is offered for supply by a wholesaler, retailer, or other distributor of the product.

How information must be disclosed

  • Published and maintained on an internet site, free of charge and accessible without pre-conditions (eg a login).
  • The address of the internet site must be disclosed on the product, or its packaging, or on a sign next to the product (where appropriate).
  • If the product is sold on the internet, the address of the internet site must be published where the product is displayed and in a way that provides a clear link to where the product information can be accessed.
  • In case the above provisions are impractical for a particular product, the address of the internet site where the product information is published, can also be disclosed in any similar way that provides the public with a clear link to the internet site where the required product information can be accessed.

Requirements for reviewing, updating, and maintaining information

  • Required product information must be kept up to date on the relevant internet site from which the information is accessible to the public.
  • Any changes to the address of the internet site must be disclosed to the public to the extent practicable and as soon as practicable.
  • The required product information must continue to be maintained on the internet site while the product is supplied or offered for supply, even if the product has been superseded, or the product is no longer manufactured.

Class 2: Custom-made lines of products

Custom-made lines of products that are made to order to client specifications. For example, external window joinery and doors that have been customised to the specifications of individual clients (for example, specifications on dimensions and glass type).

What information must be disclosed

  • A description of the building product line from which the building product is customised.
  • A product identifier, if needed.
  • Details of the manufacturer and (where applicable) importer, including contact information.
  • Relevant building code clauses, and information on the scope and limitations of use for the building product, and how it is expected to contribute to relevant building code clauses.
  • Design, installation, and maintenance requirements.
  • A statement confirming the product is not subject to a warning or ban under the Building Act 2004, or a description of any warning or ban that has been made in relation to the product.

When information must be disclosed

Prior to ordering so that potential consumers know they are ordering the right product.

How information must be disclosed

  • Published and maintained on an internet site, free of charge and accessible without pre-conditions (eg a login).
  • The address of the internet site must be disclosed on the product, or its packaging, or on a sign next to the product (where appropriate).
  • If the product is sold on the internet, the address of the internet site must be published where the product is displayed and in a way that provides a clear link to where the product information can be accessed.
  • In case the above provisions are impractical for a particular product, the address of the internet site where the product information is published, can also be disclosed in any similar way that provides the public with a clear link to the internet site where the required product information can be accessed.

Requirements for reviewing, updating, and maintaining information

  • Required product information must be kept up to date on the relevant internet site from which the information is accessible to the public.
  • Any changes to the address of the internet site must be disclosed to the public to the extent practicable and as soon as practicable.
  • The required product information must continue to be maintained on the internet site while the product is supplied or offered for supply, even if the product has been superseded, or the product is no longer manufactured.

Resources

MBIE will provide the following resources to support manufacturers, importers, distributers, and retailers to understand what their obligations are, and how to meet them.

Available resources

  • Step-by-step guide - A text and visual overview of the end-to-end process and the roles and responsibilities of each stakeholder group as required by the regulations.

Pending resources

  • Guidance document - A detailed document to support stakeholders with their responsibilities as per the regulations.
  • Exemplar product technical statements - Examples of how to provide the required product information as per the regulations.
  • Product technical statement template - A blank template which stakeholders can use to input the information they are required to provide as a result of the regulations.
  • Videos - to help stakeholders understand their responsibilities.
  • Webinar - A webinar to help stakeholders understand their responsibilities and to provide them with an opportunity to ask questions.

Step-by-step guide – Building product information requirements

An example of the end-to-end process and the roles and responsibilities of each stakeholder group as required by the regulations.

Download an infographic of a step-by-step guide for building product information requirements [PDF 799 KB]

Introducing building product information requirements will ensure there is a minimum and consistent level of product information available to support designers, building consent authorities, tradespeople and consumers to make better choices about building products.

Building work when consent is required

  1. Fibreboard Peak Limited is a New Zealand based manufacturer of weatherboards made from fibre cement sourced from overseas. To be sold in New Zealand they must provide certain product information about the weatherboards. They collate information from the manufacturer, internal quality control testing and the results of external testing.
  2. Fibreboard Peak Limited are uncertain of some of the claims from the overseas manufacturer so they check what testing was done, by who and to what international standard. They can also undertake 3rd party testing to be sure of the physical properties before including those claims in the product information.
  3. The General Manager of a large building product retailer is preparing their staff for the requirement for all products in stock to meet the minimum information requirements. There are already a number of other regulatory requirements that have to be considered such as specific product testing.
  4. The General Manager works with those staff members expand their role to track that building products they are selling comply with building product information requirements. The General Manager needs to ensure there is a process in place to check that the required information is included with the relevant products before they are made available for sale. This may include having in-store signage to ensure the information is available to the customer before purchase.
  5. The designer thinks the weatherboards from Fibreboard Peak Limited would work well in their design but hasn’t used them before and needs to check how the weatherboards secure to the building structure. The designer is able to look up the technical drawings for installation within the product information and adjust the cladding design to ensure it meets these installation requirements.
  6. The designer is also able to see how this product works with the wider building design to meet Building Code performance requirements by reading through the building product information provided with the weatherboards. It is clear from the product information that the product is not subject to a warning or a ban.
  7. The building consent officer is reviewing the building consent application for the customer’s new home. She hasn’t come across Fibreboard Peak Limited’s weatherboards before. Previously the agent would have had to seek further information from the architect to understand the weatherboards scope and limitations. Now they are able to look up the product information on the manufacturer’s website.
  8. The builder who is working on the customer’s house has not installed Fibreboard Peak Limited’s weatherboards before but, as building products now must include installation information, they are able to install the weatherboards correctly first time. They must ensure that the building products are installed so that the building work complies with the building code and the relevant plans and specifications. This saves them from having to redo them later because they weren’t installed properly.
  9. The customers are happy with how their new house is progressing. They find an alternative weatherboard they think would look better in their house. After checking the product information and discussing the relevant differences and similarities to the weatherboards being used in the rest of the house, they are confident the new weatherboards will also be fit for purpose. With the designers’ help they complete a variation to the building consent to update the building consent.
  10. Complaints regarding non-compliance by manufacturers, importers, wholesalers/retailers and distributors with the requirements for building product information is lodged with MBIE. This covers failure to provide the required building product information and making false or misleading representations about the product.
  11. The corrective action may include creating a compliant building product information to cease making false representations. MBIE may also proceed with an investigation that may lead to prosecution and imposition of applicable fines.

This information is published by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s Chief Executive. It is a general guide only and, if used, does not relieve any person of the obligation to consider any matter to which the information relates according to the circumstances of the particular case. Expert advice may be required in specific circumstances. Where this information relates to assisting people: