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Intended audience

 

This guide is mainly for BCAs and TAs to help decide how much information to request about existing buildings as part of the building consent application, so they can then determine Building Code compliance relating to means of escape from fire. This guide:

  • highlights key factors relating to the existing building and proposed building work
  • provides a building score sheet for the key factors
  • lists information you might consider asking for, depending on the total building score.

This guide will also be of interest if you are a building owner or building professional, such as an:

  • architect or designer
  • chartered professional engineer
  • other appropriately qualified licensed building practitioner.

This guide will give you some idea of the information your BCA or TA may request with your building consent application. However, we still recommend you talk to the relevant authority well before applying.

As this is a guide only, it does not guarantee what a BCA or TA will actually require.

Within scope of this guide

Within scope of this guide

Note: This guide contains advice on how much information to request about existing buildings with any building consent application, to determine Building Code compliance relating to means of escape from fire. It does not address the actual decision BCAs or TAs must make about any building consent application, including those required by the Building Act.

  • It does not help a BCA and/or TA decide if any proposed building work complies with the Building Code.
  • It does not act as a substitute for the ‘as nearly as is reasonably practicable’ (ANARP) test for means of escape from fire, as required by sections 112, 115 and 116A of the Building Act.

Note that BCAs are responsible for decisions under section 112(1), while TAs are responsible for decisions under sections 112(2), 115 and 116A.

This information is published by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s Chief Executive. It is a general guide only and, if used, does not relieve any person of the obligation to consider any matter to which the information relates according to the circumstances of the particular case. Expert advice may be required in specific circumstances. Where this information relates to assisting people: